Episode #41: Driving for Uber

P.G. Sittenfeld uberBLACKOn the 41st episode of The UrbanCincy Podcast, Jake Mecklenborg tells us about his experiences driving for the ridesharing service Uber. We discuss the types of trips that riders have been making, the best strategy for drivers, the impacts of ridesharing so far, and what other businesses Uber and Lyft could eventually get into.

 

 

 

 

Episode #40: Fort Washington Way

On the 40th episode of The UrbanCincy Podcast, we are joined by John Schneider. Although he is now widely known for his involvement in rail transit projects, Schneider was also one of the fathers of the massive Fort Washington Way rebuild that began in 1998.

Long-time UrbanCincy readers may remember David Ben‘s four-part series on Fort Washington Way, covering the many forward-thinking decisions made by project planners. A few of these include shrinking the highway’s widthbuilding the Riverfront Transit Centerbuilding new water, sewer, and fiber optic infrastructure, and adding support for “caps” which may be added in the future.

We discuss some alternative plans that were considered, such as rerouting I-71; the limitations that were placed on the project, including the need to reuse the existing Lytle Tunnel tubes; and how the stadiums, the Underground Railroad Freedom Center, and The Banks came into the picture. Finally, we speculate on the future usage of the Riverfront Transit Center, the future of USBank Arena, and when/if the highway will ever be capped.

Month in Review – August 2014

Check out UrbanCincy’s top five stories from August 2014:

  1. Initial $2M Phase of Cincy Bike Share On-Pace for September Opening
    Many of the system’s 35 stations are now installed around Downtown and Uptown Cincinnati.
  2. Will Main Street Follow in Vine Street’s Footsteps and Return to Two-Way Traffic?
    Since its conversion back to two-way traffic, Vine Street has also blossomed with dozens of new businesses. As a result, there have been several other examples of this type of conversion throughout Over-the-Rhine, including sections of Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets.
  3. MOVE Coworking Aims to Offer Non-Traditional Workers Healthy, Active Workspace
    The “active collaborative environment” that mixes the traditional shared working space with a fitness training facility.
  4. Will Saks Fifth Avenue Remain in Downtown Cincinnati Following Collapse of its Kenwood Move?
    Saks could remain in its current downtown space or move to another larger retail space in the urban core.
  5. Apple Street Market Cooperative Hoping to Fill One of Cincinnati’s Food Deserts
    When Save-A-Lot closed its Northside store in November 2013, however, it got the attention of the Cincinnati Union Coop Initiative (CUCI) and sparked an effort to open a community-owned grocery store in its place called Apple Street Market.

 

Episode #39: UrbanOhio

Cincinnati Union TerminalOn the 39th episode of The UrbanCincy Podcast, John and Travis are joined by Chris Cousins of UrbanOhio, as well as UrbanOhio forum members Aaron Davidson and Brandon Bartoszek. We discuss some of the reactions we received to Episode #37 of the podcast, and go on to discuss several urban developments and transportation projects across the state of Ohio. We also discuss the now-rejected “Save Our Icons” proposal, and how Union Terminal and Music Hall tie into Cincinnati’s “embarrassment of riches”. Finally, we talk about why different Ohio cities have such different perceptions of their urban cores.

Note: This episode contains a bit more explicit language than you are used to hearing on the podcast.

Photo of Union Terminal by Brandon Bartoszek.

Will Uptown Transit District increase ridership for Metro?

Uptown Transit DistrictThe UC*Metro program, which allows University of Cincinnati students, faculty, and staff to purchase discounted transit passes, has seen many changes since it was introduced in 2007. With the latest extension to the agreement, the cost is unchanged; students will be able to purchase passes for $53 per semester for the next three academic years. The cost for employees is also unchanged at $160 per semester.

What riders will notice, however, is that several of the Metro facilities they’ll use have been significantly upgraded. Work is now complete on the Uptown Transit District, Metro’s name for a number of improvements at four locations near campus. In addition to wayfinding signage and improved lighting, all of the new stops feature real-time arrival information, which was first introduced by Metro in 2012, and two of the stops also feature ticket vending machines, like the ones Metro installed at the Government Square bus hub earlier this year.

The Uptown Transit District upgrades are an example of how the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) is continuing to improve service and increase ridership in spite of its limited budget. In February, we reported that SORTA is one of the best stewards of limited financial resources, compared to 11 peer agencies across the country.

In 2012, SORTA built the Glenway Crossing Transit Center park and ride location, which seves several routes, including the 32, 38X, and 41. Earlier this year, SORTA reported that ridership was up by as much around 20% on these routes compared to the previous year.

While SORTA isn’t anticipating a specific increase in ridership due to the Uptown Transit District upgrades, the goal of those improvements was to “make it easier for current and new riders,” Jill Dunne, Public Affairs Manager for SORTA, told UrbanCincy.