The Best Open Data Releases of 2012

The year 2012 is over. But it’s important to occasionally look back and see what we did well, and not so well, as a society over the last 12 months. One particular item that has become increasingly more significant in planning our cities is open data. From tracking crime in Philadelphia, bikeshare activity in Boston, transit usage in Atlanta, green roofs in Chicago, to rat sightings in New York City…open data has gone viral. More from The Atlantic on the top 10 open data releases of 2012:

Last year, Atlantic Cities named ten of its favorite metro datasets of 2011 from cities across North America, illustrating the breadth of what we might learn (regarding mosquito traps! misplaced vehicles! energy consumption!) in the still relatively young field of urban open data. For this year’s installment, we’re going one step further. Sure, raw data is great. But useful tools, maps and data visualizations built with said data are even better.

In this story, you’ll find our picks for 2012′s best open data releases from municipal vaults, with an emphasis on tools that can be used by anyone, not just developers and data geeks.

This Up To Speed link is meant to share perspectives from around the world that may be of interest to our readers. We do not necessarily agree or disagree with the views and perspectives shared in those stories.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1414890499 Matt Jacob

    I’m a big fan of the Philly crime data map with all its detail. The Enquirer ran this crime map on Cincy homicides last week – http://cin.ci/13ceT2X – but not surprisingly they only showed the City and left off all the suburbs (giving the impression that there’s more crime in the city). It’s useful and could be the start of something even better though.

    The Boston bikeshare is a great visualization of public transportation data. In Cincinnati, Metro/TANK could probably do the same thing with their buses. It might not be very simple right now with their current fare systems but you would hope that it would be an integrated part of any new system overhaul towards reloadable electronic cards.