Atlanta’s bold plan for repurposing its unused railways already paying off

The multi-modal Atlanta BeltLine project is spurring new investment throughout inner-city neighborhoods that had long been forgotten in the southeastern city. What lessons might Cincinnati be able to learn from Atlanta’s experience as it looks to repurpose its unused railway corridors? More from the Washington Post:

Since a new urban trail opened last month in an old rail corridor in Atlanta, it has drawn a steady stream of joggers, dog-walkers and cyclists to take in spectacular views of the skyline and neighborhoods once seen only by train. Hundreds of trees have been planted along the paved 14-foot-wide path, while artists have added works such as windmills made of bicycle parts and colorful murals on concrete overpasses.

The path, known as the Eastside Trail, is part of a $2.8 billion plan to transform a 22-mile railroad corridor that encircles Atlanta into a network of trails, parks, affordable homes and ultimately streetcar lines. The Atlanta BeltLine is an example of rails-to-trails projects going on around the country, including in New York and Chicago, that aim to make better use of old rail corridors by creating better-connected and more livable urban areas, providing alternatives to car travel and spurring economic development.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lordsik-Dragunfir/100001308789403 Lordsik Dragunfir

    Hardly the Southeast. Even saying Grant Park is Southeast would be pushing it. However, the trail doesn’t even reach Grant Park yet. Let’s get this trail built! What’s taking them so long to put in the trail for the Southeast end?

  • Guest

    Portland’s 40-Mile Loop Trail and the Louisville Loop seem to